Friday, December 10, 2010

A new approach to painting

I've been dissatisfied with my painting methods for a while now so I'm trying to branch out and do something else. I've always been more of a draftsman and color has never really been my thing. Some of you can attest to that. Anyway, here's the first in a long line of experiments. Feedback would be most appreciated.

6 comments:

  1. Randy! I think you're on to something. It's a lot stronger than your older paintings. Great job with the lighting. I think you need to make sure to pay attention to the core shadows- especially in the body. The lighting in the face is great, though. Nicely done, Randy!
    It would be nice to know what you did, exactly...

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  2. Awesome! I like the green lighting. Definitely more frightening. Another thing to think about in the shadows is that shadows are the opposite of the light color wise. So if you have a green light your going to have a red shadow. So a slightly redish tint in the shadow areas, like on his face and arms could amp up the scary vibe. Very cool. I look forward to seeing more!

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  3. This way of painting is going in a great direction for you Randy, congrats! I really like the treatment of the areas in light, but the shadows are still coming a little flat. I would also say a little dark, but I'm not sure if that was what you were going for. More attention to the core shadows and reflected light will really make the form turn, and you'll be set!
    I'd also be interested in what process you did for this painting.

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  4. WELLLLLL.... As far as the process goes, I just did flat color to begin with and then I painted the shadows in on a multiplied layer and the lights in on a screen layer. I used some sweet textured brushes that I got from Stephen Sitton. Nothing too complicated. Thanks for the feedback guys.

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  5. Randy, I agree with Shara's comment that the dude looks too dark. I think the problem is that you originally painted him on a darker background. (I know because I saw it :D)Once you dragged him over to a white background he is going to feel a lot darker. I might recommend trying something. I think it would help you out. I know that this might sound outside of your "style" but hear me out....

    I think you should try, at least once or twice, covering up your line entirely. You have some pretty awesome line work so I'm not telling you that you should do away with it permanently. There's a purpose in my suggestion. I think when you start to cover up the line you will realize what parts of the form are reading and what parts are not. For example, I think certain things like his hands/head might read fine without the line. But when you get into the areas like his vest/fur etc. you would star to get lost on what is what. I think, at the beginning, painting without depending on line would help you to identify areas that need more attention. Then when you put the line back on top of it it would be even more awesomer :D I guess it all depends on the look you are trying to achieve. But, I think it would be beneficial for you to try it out a few times.

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  6. well, i'll have to admit that's an excellent suggestion. i'll try it

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